Category Archives: Russia/E. Europe

Carlo Baldassari

At fourteen, a  Renaissance man in the making embarked on a journey, which would mark the beginning of a new life. Carlo Baldassari was the eldest son in a family of seven children. He arrived upon the shores of Galveston and made his way to New York. In order to provide for himself, Baldassari sold brooms and possibly participated in ... Read More »

“From Russia With Love”

Dey Rose was one of 8 featured storytellers at the Media Center’s salon called “Foreign Correspondents: Immigrant Odysseys.” Her story, recorded in this 10 minute video, is about her grandmother.  She has also submitted this story in writing here.  Dey is an instructor in the Stanford Graduate School of Education. Read More »

History of the Fine, Dorosin & Kopelov Families

(Editor’s Note: This is a bit of a departure from the usual format. It is a fascinating research paper written by Maddie Bennet, for her 11th grade US History class at Kehillah Jewish High School in Palo Alto, CA.) I am a third generation American Jew, and, like many Jews, my roots go back to Eastern Europe.  My research focuses ... Read More »

The Time of His Life

My father was born, in 1895, in what is now Ukraine. When he was 13, in 1908, he was apprenticed as a tailor. In about 1914 he immigrated. He traveled by horse and carriage, other surface transportation, boat and train to Chicago. On the boat, for the first time in his life, he was without adult supervision. He had the ... Read More »

Jeremy Barousse

Jeremy’s grandparents left home in Poland when the Nazis invaded.  His grandmother was only 16 when she made it to a refugee camp. In California they worked in the fields. Read More »

Ida Goldstein

This is a story about my Grandma Ida. Here is what I know: She came to the United States from Russia around 1910, when she was fourteen years old. Before she left, it was a dangerous time to be a Jew in her village; there were a lot of pogroms, and even though she was just a young girl, she ... Read More »

Rebecca Cohen and Blanche Meisel

My great-grandmother, Rebecca Cohen, came to the U.S. in 1899, with her 6-month old daughter, Blanche, in her arms. She was fleeing the Cossack-led pogroms in the Russian Pale of Settlement, the only place the autocracy let Jews have permanent residency. We don’t know exactly where her shtetl was–somewhere in what’s now Belarus, near Minsk. My great-grandmother started a farm ... Read More »

Usher Dushnitzer

My grandfather, Usher Dushnitzer, came to the U.S. in 1928 or 1929 at around age 26.  He grew up in a small town called Luknick in what is now Lithuania in a very Orthodox Jewish environment.  His father was a well known Rabbi who ran a religious seminary called a Yeshiva. During the Bolshevik Revolution that lasted from 1917 – ... Read More »

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